Wellness Blog - IV Therapy Benefits, Wellness Insights, and Vitality Boosting Tips

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely used metric to assess body weight relative to height and is often regarded as a standard tool for gauging overall health. However, as we delve into the intricacies of BMI, it becomes evident that its accuracy can be affected by the vast differences in population demographics across the nation. In this month’s article, we will explore the limitations of BMI, understand its role in health assessment, and explore alternative methods that individuals can use to ensure they are at a healthy weight and body size for their optimum well-being.

The Basics of Body Mass Index (BMI):

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure calculated by dividing an individual’s weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters (BMI = weight (kg) / height^2 (m^2)). The resulting value is then categorized into different ranges, such as underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obesity. This standardized metric was initially intended to provide a general assessment of a person’s weight in relation to their height and serves as a screening tool for potential health risks associated with body weight.

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Limitations of BMI:

Despite its widespread use, BMI has several limitations, particularly when applied to diverse populations. One of the main concerns is that BMI does not differentiate between fat mass and muscle mass. Individuals with a higher muscle mass, such as athletes and bodybuilders, may fall into the overweight or obese categories, even though they have low body fat and excellent cardiovascular health.

Moreover, BMI fails to account for the distribution of body fat. Central adiposity (excess fat around the waist) is known to be more detrimental to health than fat distributed in other areas of the body. Two individuals with the same BMI can have varying health risks based on their body fat distribution.

Variability in Population Demographics:

The population demographics across the nation are incredibly diverse, encompassing people of different ethnicities, cultures, and genetic backgrounds. These differences can significantly impact the interpretation of BMI. For instance, some ethnic groups may have a higher proportion of muscle mass, while others may have a predisposition to storing more fat in certain areas of the body.

As a result, relying solely on BMI to determine health risks can lead to misinterpretations and may not accurately reflect an individual’s health status.

Seeking Healthier Alternatives:

Given the limitations of BMI, it is essential to explore alternative methods that can provide a more comprehensive assessment of health and well-being. Here are some viable alternatives to consider:

A. Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR):

Waist-to-Hip Ratio is a measurement that assesses the distribution of fat in the body by dividing the waist circumference by the hip circumference. A higher WHR indicates central adiposity, which is associated with increased health risks. Unlike BMI, WHR takes into account the location of body fat, providing a more accurate assessment of potential health risks.

B. Body Composition Analysis:

Body composition analysis is a more advanced approach that utilizes methods such as Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA), bioelectrical impedance, or underwater weighing. These methods assess the proportion of fat, muscle, bone, and water in the body. By understanding the composition of the body, individuals can gain insight into their overall health and tailor lifestyle changes accordingly.

C. Waist Circumference:

Measuring waist circumference can be a simple yet effective method to evaluate health risks. Abdominal fat is closely associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. A waist circumference exceeding certain thresholds can be an indicator of potential health issues, regardless of BMI.

Body Mass Index (BMI)

While Body Mass Index (BMI) has been a standard tool for assessing body weight and health. Its limitations become apparent when considering the vast differences in population demographics across the nation. The nuances of body fat distribution and varying muscle mass among diverse groups make it essential to seek alternative methods for assessing health risks accurately.

By exploring alternatives such as Waist-to-Hip Ratio, Body Composition Analysis, and Waist Circumference, individuals can gain a more comprehensive understanding of their health status. This can help to make informed decisions to achieve optimal well-being. It is crucial to remember that individualized assessments, coupled with a holistic approach to health, are key to promoting a healthier and more sustainable lifestyle.

Body Mass Index (BMI)


Stay tuned for my next adventure into Wellness, until then… 

Aloha a hui hou!!  

Keonemana

Check out our other articles you can find on our Blog:

Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia

Aloha!! In this month’s article, we will delve deeper into the origins of the fear of needles as a subconscious protective mechanism, explore the historical development of hypodermic needles and their life-saving impact, discuss the science behind the pain response and vasovagal reactions during needle puncture procedures, and provide comprehensive strategies to help individuals alleviate anxiety, fear, and reduce the potential for a vasovagal response.

The fear of needles, also known as needle phobia or trypanophobia, is a common and understandable concern among patients and clients in medical settings. This fear can lead to heightened anxiety, increased stress, and even avoidance of necessary medical procedures, such as intravenous (IV) insertion.

Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia

The Fear of Needles: A Subconscious Protective Mechanism

The fear of needles has deep-rooted origins in human evolution. Throughout history, encounters with sharp objects were often associated with danger, as injuries from these objects could lead to severe infections or even death. As a result, humans have developed an instinctive aversion to sharp objects, including needles.

This subconscious protective mechanism is an evolutionary adaptation that seeks to preserve our well-being. Our brains associate needle-like objects with potential harm, triggering the fight-or-flight response to avoid perceived danger. This innate response has been vital for human survival, protecting our ancestors from potential harm.

In the context of modern medicine, the fear of needles can become problematic for both patients and healthcare providers. However, understanding that this fear is deeply rooted in our evolutionary history can foster empathy and help healthcare professionals approach needle procedures with sensitivity and care.

The Medical Development of Hypodermic Needles: A Lifesaving Advancement

The invention of the hypodermic needle in the mid-19th century revolutionized healthcare practices and had a profound impact on medicine. Before this groundbreaking development, medical treatments were limited to oral administration or topical applications, which were often less effective in critical situations.

Hypodermic needles allowed for the precise delivery of medications and fluids directly into the bloodstream, enabling rapid and effective treatment. This breakthrough technology led to significant advancements in medical interventions, from administering anesthesia during surgeries to delivering life-saving medications in emergency situations.

Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia

However, it is essential to recognize that while hypodermic needles brought about unparalleled medical benefits, they also became associated with painful medical procedures, further contributing to the fear of needles among patients. The perception of pain during needle insertion, coupled with the fear of potential complications, has continued to fuel needle phobia.

The Science Behind Vasovagal Reactions and Needle Sticks

In addition, another challenging aversion to needles is when someone experiences an episode known as a Vasovagal Response. When a needle is inserted into the skin, nociceptors (pain receptors) detect the piercing, sending signals to the brain’s sensory cortex. This process activates the pain response, causing discomfort or pain sensations. Additionally, the fear and anxiety associated with needles can intensify the perception of pain.

For some individuals, the fear of needles can trigger what’s known as a Vasovagal Response. This autonomic nervous system reaction results in a sudden drop in heart rate and blood pressure, leading to lightheadedness, dizziness, and even fainting. The vasovagal response is a protective mechanism that diverts blood away from the extremities to preserve essential organs when the body perceives a threat. Patients and/or Clients who experience postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) or orthostatic hypotension also known as postural hypotension, have a higher chance in experiencing an episode of a Vasovagal Response during a needle insertion.

Understanding the science behind pain and vasovagal responses can provide healthcare providers with valuable insights into how to minimize discomfort and stress during needle procedures. Implementing patient-centered care and adopting techniques to reduce anxiety can significantly improve the overall experience for needle-phobic patients.

Coping Strategies to Alleviate Anxiety and Fear of Needles

Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia

For patients and clients who experience fear or anxiety related to needles and or have a history of experiencing a vasovagal response, there are several coping strategies that can help alleviate distress and reduce the potential for vasovagal responses:

  • Relaxation Techniques: Practicing relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation, or guided imagery, can help calm the mind and reduce anxiety before and during medical procedures involving needles. Encouraging patients to practice these techniques regularly can enhance their ability to cope with fear and anxiety.
  • Distraction Techniques: Engaging in activities or conversations that divert attention away from the needle procedure can reduce anxiety levels. Listening to music, watching videos, or focusing on a specific object can be effective distractions. Healthcare providers can offer distractions during needle procedures to help patients focus on positive experiences rather than their fear.
  • Gradual Exposure: Gradual exposure to needles, starting with less intimidating situations and progressing to more challenging ones, can build tolerance and reduce fear over time. Gradual exposure allows patients to confront their fear in a controlled manner, helping them gain confidence in managing their emotional response.
Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia
  • Seeking Support: Talking openly with healthcare providers about needle phobia allows for a supportive and understanding environment. Healthcare professionals can provide reassurance, educate patients about the medical necessity of certain procedures, and offer techniques to help manage anxiety.

The fear of needles is a natural and deeply ingrained response rooted in our evolutionary history. While this fear can be challenging for patients and clients, it is essential to recognize that they are not alone in their struggles. Understanding the origins of this fear, the historical development of hypodermic needles, and the science behind pain responses and vasovagal reactions can foster empathy and awareness among healthcare providers.

By implementing coping strategies such as relaxation exercises, distraction techniques, and gradual exposure, patients and clients can take proactive steps to reduce their anxiety and fear related to needles. Together, with the support of healthcare professionals, we can create a more compassionate and comforting environment, ensuring that procedures involving needles, like Intravenous Hydration Therapy provided here at Pure Drip IV Health and Wellness, are as stress-free and as tolerable as possible for all individuals. By addressing the fear of needles and providing effective coping strategies, we empower patients to manage their emotions and enhance their overall medical experience.


Stay tuned for my next adventure into Wellness, until then… 

Aloha a hui hou!!  

Keonemana

Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia

Needle Phobia or Trypanophobia

Check out our other articles you can find on our Blog:

IV Hydration – Wellness Part 7

Aloha esteemed readers, it has been getting HOT out there! Hitting the reservoir or cooling by the river has been my favorite way to beat the heat and help to reduce my general stress levels, there’s nothing like being out in nature to help ground you. What do you do to escape the heat and ground yourself from the daily grind and stress?

In the last few articles we discussed the benefits of general hydration as well as the long term effects of dehydration. In this month’s article I am eager to discuss the benefits of “Intravenous (IV) Hydration”, a medical intervention that has immense potential in benefiting your well-being. This method entails the direct infusion of fluids and nutrients into the bloodstream, circumventing the digestive system to achieve rapid absorption and overall nourishment.

Intravenous hydration offers a compelling solution for individuals grappling with dehydration-related symptoms, such as fatigue, dizziness, and muscle cramps. By reinstating the body’s fluid balance, this therapy ushers in a renewed sense of vigor and vitality, making it a potent remedy for those seeking swift recovery and enhanced health.

The true beauty of Intravenous (IV) Hydration lies in its unique ability to deliver fluids and nutrients directly to every cell and tissue in the body. Incorporating IV hydration into one’s wellness regimen confers unparalleled advantages. Whether you are a busy professional, an athlete recuperating from intense physical exertion, or an individual looking for a path to better wellness and nutrient absorbtion, IV hydration holds the potential to invigorate your body and promote optimal health.

A Journey into Wellness Part 7 – IV Hydration

IV Hydration – Wellness Part 7

The science behind intravenous hydration revolves around the administration of a meticulously balanced solution directly into the veins, ensuring efficient delivery of fluids, electrolytes, vitamins, and minerals essential for physiological equilibrium. IV hydration transcends mere rehydration, as it plays a pivotal role in supporting various medical treatments and accelerating recovery, thus qualifying as an indispensable facet of preventive medicine.

Rest assured, the administration of intravenous hydration, here at Pure Drip IV Health and Wellness, is meticulously prepared by trained healthcare professionals, who are Registered Nurses, to ensure your safety. Your well-being is of our utmost importance. Furthermore, this therapy can be tailored to cater to your specific needs, be it rehydration, immune support, or vitamin replenishment.

The therapeutic applications of IV hydration are extensive and transcend physical health. This treatment exerts a beneficial influence on mental acuity, focus, and overall cognitive function. By optimally nourishing the body, intravenous hydration facilitates superior mental performance, enhancing productivity and promoting a heightened sense of well-being.

Contrary to popular belief, intravenous hydration is not confined to the acute clinical setting or just for the treatment of severe dehydration. Let us delve deeper into the scientific intricacies of IV Hydration. For athletes, IV Hydration proves invaluable in rapidly replenishing essential nutrients lost during strenuous physical activities. This facilitates optimal muscle repair and mitigates the risk of post-exercise soreness. By optimizing the body’s nutrient levels, athletes can significantly enhance their performance and achieve new milestones in their fitness endeavors.

Individuals grappling with chronic illnesses can also benefit profoundly from IV Hydration. Conditions such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome, to name a few, may lead to dehydration and compromised nutrient absorption. IV Hydration serves as a critical tool in bridging nutritional gaps and improving overall well-being, empowering patients to better manage their conditions.

IV Hydration plays a pivotal role in bolstering immune health. As we navigate various environmental stressors and pathogenic threats, our immune system requires optimal nourishment to function at its best. IV Hydration, enriched with immune-boosting vitamins and minerals, fortifies the body’s defense mechanisms, reducing the risk of infections and facilitating expedited recovery from illnesses.

A Journey into Wellness Part 7 – IV Hydration

IV Hydration – Wellness Part 7

Beyond immediate relief, IV Hydration fosters enduring health benefits. Incorporating this therapy into your regular wellness routine, you establish a robust foundation for sustained health maintenance and disease prevention. However, it is vital to recognize that IV Hydration does not replace a wholesome lifestyle. I am an advocate for a comprehensive approach to well-being, encompassing proper nutrition, regular exercise, stress management, and adequate rest. IV Hydration should complement these practices and serve as an indispensable adjunct for addressing specific health needs.

Intravenous Hydration stands as a potent testament to the wonders of modern medicine. Its scientific efficacy in restoring physiological balance, expediting recovery, and promoting optimal health is truly awe-inspiring. 

Stay tuned for my next adventure into Wellness, until then… 

Aloha a hui hou!!  

Keonemana

Check out our other articles you can find on our Blog:

Chasing Hydration

Welcome back, it has been a beautiful summer so far. No regrets about the late start due to the rain because now everything is so green!!. I hope the season so far has been treating all of you well, and that you have been putting time into your personal journey of wellness!!

          Chasing Hydration

In this month’s article I want to talk about dehydration. I always feel like I hear about all the health benefits of hydration, its key importance in wellness, and its critical role in so many functions in the body. Though, I also feel like I’m personally chasing adequate, or even mediocre, hydration. Life gets distracting and by the end of the day I realize I’ve had more cups of coffee than I had glasses of water! I know I “talk the talk” when it comes to good hydration, but I should also “walk the walk”. In this month’s article I want to highlight barriers to good hydration, what dehydration might feel and look like, as well as the potential long-term effects of dehydration on your body, health, and wellbeing. 

A good way to begin is to talk about what is the ideal amount of water we ought to be drinking each day. It would be convenient to be able to provide a nice round number of ounces or liters that transcends all genders, ages, body types, activity levels, and other demographics, but it isn’t that simple. Your individual needs may vary due to your personal circumstances. Though we’ll do our best to address a generalized idea of adequate hydration as well as ways to assess your individual state of hydration.  

Chasing Hydration

Chasing Hydration

“Although nutritional and physiological research teams and professional organizations have described the daily “Total Water Intakes” and “Adequate Intakes” of children, women, and men, there is no widespread consensus regarding the human water requirements of different demographic groups. These requirements remain undefined because of the dynamic complexity inherent in the human water regulatory network, which involves the central nervous system and several organ systems, as well as large inter-individual differences.”

“Total water intake includes drinking water, water in beverages, and water in food. Daily water needs determined from fluid balance, water turnover, or consumption studies provide similar values for a given set of conditions. A daily water intake of 3.7 L for adult men and 2.7 L for adult women meets the needs of the vast majority of persons. However, strenuous physical exercise and heat stress can greatly increase daily water needs, and the individual variability between athletes can be substantial.”

In our previous article, “Hydration essential to Weight Loss, Wellness, and Health Support“ and in our “Between Two IV’s” Episode 2 we talk about a good way to measure your personal hydration that anyone can do in the comfort of their own home and privacy.  

This has to do with the color of your urine. The ideal color is just about clear, with a slight tinge of yellow. It would also have a very subtle, to no smell to it, at all. If your urine is darker in color, even a light golden yellow, and there is a noticeable smell, it is a good indication that you need to drink more water. Keep in mind that some foods and medications can alter both the color and smell of your urine.

A common example are drinks that contain alcohol or caffeine which can make your urine clear and at times odorless. Alcohol and Caffeine are also diuretics which promote additional fluid loss and dehydration. There are also several medications that cause dehydration, and some chronic medical conditions that really require individuals to maintain adequate hydration to maintain a baseline of healthy living (ex. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

          Chasing Hydration

There are some common barriers to achieving adequate hydration that we may have all faced at some point. Most of them are behavioral and lifestyle/habit forming behaviors. Luckily all of which can be changed, but like most things in our lifestyle that may require adjustment, it takes concerted effort, conscious awareness, and willpower. Most of the research on this subject really reflects challenges in the aging population in the clinical setting. Though I am certain we can all understand that in the general population, from young to old, there are some common themes that we have personal experience with or know of individuals that have:

  1. The dislike of the taste of plain water; 
  2. Not having regularly accessible water for frequent fluid intake (e.g.: water bottle);
  3. Too busy and distracted and forget to drink water;
  4. Not wanting to use the restroom too frequently;

If you have challenges with drinking just plain water, you can add a little flare to it. Adding a slice of lemon or orange, even a few slices of cucumber or fresh strawberries can add additional flavor to your water without additional sugars, caffeine, or sodium that can promote more diuresis and dehydration. Carbonated soda water can also be a good alternative, but be sure to read the labeled ingredients to ensure it contains just carbonated water and natural flavors, avoiding sweeteners, caffeine, and drinks with sodium in them as that can promote dehydration.  

Chasing Hydration

Chasing Hydration

Having quick access to water can make it easier and more consistent to achieve regular water consumption and be able to maintain adequate hydration. Buying a dedicated water bottle for this objective can be helpful. Setting a goal to pick up your water bottle to take frequent sips every hour on the hour or challenging yourself on how many times you refill your water bottle each day can be engaging, turning it into a fun personal goal or game each day. The main thing is to set yourself up for success, make it fun and engaging, and provide yourself with the tools to be successful in your goal to be well hydrated.

          I can totally understand that some days can get too busy, we get distracted, and/or the urge to frequently use the restroom from drinking lots of water can get in the way of a productive day. Trust me I’ve been there, where leaving the Operating Room in the midst of a case to use the bathroom wasn’t an option. Our bodies will adjust as we adjust to more fluid intake, and avoiding drinks or additives that promote diuresis will lower the bathroom frequency. 

          This might be a good segue way into better understanding what dehydration might feel and look like in these scenarios where we don’t achieve adequate hydration regularly and what the potential long-term effects of sustained dehydration does to your body, health, and wellbeing 

          

Besides the changes in color and smell to your urine as previously aforementioned, dehydration can affect and manifest in other symptoms that you may not readily recognize. Some of the more common symptoms include headache, muscle cramps, tiredness, etc. These in itself can ruin a day of being able to focus and be productive. Furthermore, symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, weakness, malaise, lightheadedness, dry mouth, low blood pressure, loss of appetite except for sugar cravings, just to name a few, can all be signs of dehydration. 

          It’s important to recognize these signs and symptoms of dehydration so that we can take the necessary steps to rehydrate our bodies. Ignoring the signals can lead to more severe consequences and long-term effects on our overall health and well-being.

          One of the significant impacts of sustained dehydration is its effect on cognitive function. Studies have shown that even mild dehydration can impair cognitive performance, including attention, memory, and mood. When we don’t provide our bodies with enough water, it can affect our ability to think clearly, concentrate, and make decisions effectively. So, staying properly hydrated is not only crucial for our physical health but also for maintaining optimal mental performance.

         Dehydration can also have negative effects on our cardiovascular system. When we are dehydrated, our blood volume decreases, which makes it harder for the heart to pump blood efficiently. This can lead to increased heart rate, decreased blood pressure, and reduced oxygen supply to the muscles and organs. Over time, chronic dehydration can put strain on the cardiovascular system and increase the risk of developing conditions such as hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

          Furthermore, dehydration can have a significant impact on our digestive system. Insufficient water intake can contribute to constipation, as water helps soften the stool and facilitate its passage through the intestines. When we don’t drink enough water, our body tries to conserve water, resulting in drier and harder stools. This can lead to discomfort and gastrointestinal issues, affecting our overall digestive health.

          In addition to these immediate effects, chronic dehydration can have long-term consequences for our kidneys. Our kidneys play a vital role in filtering waste products from the blood and maintaining fluid balance in the body. When we are consistently dehydrated, it puts additional stress on the kidneys and reduces their ability to function optimally. Over time, this can increase the risk of developing kidney stones, urinary tract infections, and even kidney damage.

         

Another aspect to consider is the impact of dehydration on our skin health. Water is essential for maintaining the elasticity and moisture of our skin. When we are dehydrated, our skin can become dry, flaky, and lose its natural glow. In the long run, chronic dehydration can contribute to premature aging, fine lines, and wrinkles. Therefore, staying hydrated is not only beneficial for our internal organs but also for maintaining healthy and vibrant skin.

          

It’s clear that dehydration goes beyond simple thirst and can have far-reaching effects on our bodies, health, and overall well-being. To ensure we stay adequately hydrated, it’s important to develop healthy hydration habits and overcome the barriers that may hinder our water intake.

          Remember, the ideal amount of water you need may vary depending on various factors such as age, gender, activity level, and environmental conditions. However, a good rule of thumb is to aim for a daily water intake of approximately 3.7 liters for adult men and 2.7 liters for adult women, which meets the needs of the majority of individuals under normal conditions. However, factors like strenuous physical exercise, heat stress, and certain medical conditions may increase your water requirements.

          To gauge your individual state of hydration, you can monitor the color and odor of your urine as a simple indicator. If your urine is pale yellow or clear with a subtle smell, it’s a good sign that you’re well-hydrated. Darker-colored urine and a strong odor indicate that you need to increase your fluid intake. Keep in mind medications you may be taking, as well, what foods or drinks you may have consumed that day as it may provide a false indication of hydration as it relates to urine color and odor.

          Overcoming barriers to adequate hydration requires conscious effort and a few lifestyle adjustments. If you find plain water unappealing, try infusing it with slices of lemon, orange, cucumber, or fresh strawberries to add natural flavor without additional sugars or caffeine. Carbonated water can also be a refreshing alternative, but be cautious of added sweeteners, caffeine, or sodium content. Investing in a dedicated water bottle and setting reminders to take frequent sips throughout the day can help you maintain consistent hydration.

Chasing Hydration

Chasing Hydration

While it’s understandable that busy schedules and frequent restroom breaks can be challenging, remember that your body will adapt to increased fluid intake, and the frequency of restroom visits will likely decrease. The benefits of maintaining proper hydration, including improved cognitive function, cardiovascular health, digestion, kidney function, and skin health, far outweigh the inconveniences.

          Dehydration is not a trivial matter. It can have significant short-term and long-term effects on our health and well-being. By understanding the barriers to hydration, recognizing the signs of dehydration, and making conscious efforts to prioritize adequate fluid intake, we can take control of our hydration levels and reap the benefits of a well-hydrated body. So, let’s make hydration a priority in our daily lives and ensure that we “walk the walk” when it comes to maintaining good hydration practices for our overall health and well-being.

Stay tuned for my next adventure into Wellness, until then… 

Aloha a hui hou!!  

Keonemana

Chasing Hydration


  1. https://scholar.google.com/scholar?start=10&q=Signs+of+adequate+hydration&hl=en&as_sdt=0,6
  1. https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article/64/10/457/1833566
  1. https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/pnur.2010.21.5.47917?journalCode=pnur
  1. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/srt.12454
  1. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S019745720039509X
  1. https://journals.healio.com/doi/abs/10.3928/00989134-20130110-01
  1. https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2014-55601-001.pdf
  1. https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/12/1928
  1. https://watermark.silverchair.com/nutritionreviews63-s030.pdf?token=AQECAHi208BE49Ooan9kkhW_Ercy7Dm3ZL_9Cf3qfKAc485ysgAAAwIwggL-BgkqhkiG9w0BBwagggLvMIIC6wIBADCCAuQGCSqGSIb3DQEHATAeBglghkgBZQMEAS4wEQQMqGLmFwFvPsNsxXi8AgEQgIICtWo6Fn_TSI1eomirvzIDBDNhxS_pM2ZbXJcTcNt42DWtyTknFA46s_js-V5qyv5sOHZxE8JDvxEXMgY8PqEpuqXm-pBCy7rdmZi5qR8TOzq_mJodPDEx7-rQ7tRE_5qyvg6k5UH9OfrGuvMqgWkBm9t_ookJCln0tb4akFezdx7hsJR_cDBdOkfSFZRzpzw-m5-8tKNoOiVo4zP9A2l7lOWRT6308CzVhTsynNBNSxdxaWn5Z-G7ktN-A8nSdCSNuzfatjjgVgkQjrrH6uD0BBgndq4d3OM_-zYAB6wMvMAgnNA90REce9euM2CkI9_kb_xyA34aDjzfTUrz824gB733j33qf9FR1goeOsZnpPGc3tXjhISJ5DWYStltJ2DxD-I7rqXGKRwRF-NEDUMqSykLd7pb8z-r_gpJOSSa5cmwo6jMQc2DecX-zqY4Qg-5_O52voX4TnMbVVmVFGmTSzEysdKVhjIa0N1esC8egSxT-mIE2r9X9raDRxdw_RGrpZY-Q5KaHq-JO1ciivxVFeGJFq_cxzU6fTCK7N2B_vLRHKDvJrZiitfXAfZptXYdOtxBm6sQ02evvEcWTMfDlHcNmVu-7xP2jpE4cLVK4BjJmvkzVqfPfkKcyy6S1-r8GlAnqutObowBag_Hb3dyDDz3u8YqXewsPna1orIJ-X50wqx_zDkrIVuAlEG5ylYEoFDroKxQaKDfVJkENAcPMsE1zNnVorZohDCZeJgEXavdhOqtjNvyhh0FefMUR-xa2z64STiq165vRcpfKUy3RSbszsVAAthEmkZgEvLZuNH4oy3exCZWlHfN_ixPXYdPEcxDNQQbkf5YD6-Aw8OqYIbpwLhgB_RJ3Y-Fc9aK_YuFzQ8DqwE7c0x3JKFbQ81ImLs3lohV3slNz1yFFmKfGSIxSlb6vw
  1. https://puredripiv.com/2023/06/22/a-journey-into-wellness-part-5-hydration-essential-to-weight-loss-wellness-and-health-support/
  1. https://puredripiv.com/2023/03/30/between-two-ivs-episode-2/
  1. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/treatments/9013-dehydration

Check out our other articles you can find on our Blog:

TOP